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Chapter 7 - The Death of Dede Antanas

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sabrina sabrina
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Re: Chapter 7 - The Death of Dede Antanas

Dede Antanas died at a time when his family wasn't in a good place. He was very old and sick but his life was severely shortened by his work in Packingtown. He worked in a cold, unheated cellar that only made him sicker. He walked in chemicals all day that put holes in his shoes and resulted in sores on his feet. Antanas had a very bad cough that only got worse, along with infections and other injuries that led to his weakening and eventual death. With all this happening to Antanas, he would not stop which led to an even faster death. Another factor being he couldn't afford decent clothes to wear in the winter to keep him warm causing his immune system to weaken.

When Antanas started to get worse he started asking people about what was happening. They all shook him off, saying it was normal, and even workers in the best shape would only last a few years. Why? Because of the filth and the non-existing safety regulations in the work place. Like I stated in the previous paragraph, Antanas was soaked in chemicals all day resulting in sores and cuts, easily infected by the filth of the town. The people of that town let it get that nasty, to the point people would die of infection from one little cut.

But it's not like Antanas's boss cared. He just replace Antanas like we would replace a sock after stepping in water. It's nothing, it's easy and the boss doesn't lose anything. Antanas was old and sick and couldn't work as well as a younger worker. So if anything, the boss saw it as gaining a better worker for the price of the "crappy" one he just lost.
sabrina sabrina
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Re: Chapter 7 - The Death of Dede Antanas

In reply to this post by Matt Jenkins
You made some really good observations.
sabrina sabrina
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Re: Chapter 7 - The Death of Dede Antanas

In reply to this post by Shannon.Finley
Your response was good. I like how you related personal experience to the cold in Chicago.
KLUMP KLUMP
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Re: Chapter 7 - The Death of Dede Antanas

In reply to this post by Mr. Tobias
    As said in Chapter one Antanas was not a very old man and that it was the stress of his job, the fact that he could loose it at any moment, and the terrible working conditions, he was basically a janitor in the picking section of the slaughter house, walking around all day in deep slop and having to clean out the meat catchers every so often. The pickling room was also an unheated/uncooled basement that was terribly cold during the winter and always wet, which was what gave Antanas his cough.    

Antanas lasting only a few months in Packingtown speaks volumes about the horrible working/living conditions in Packingtown. The conditions in Packing town were atrocious, no regulation on maximum or minimum working hours, no cares about sanity of the products or workplace, no job security, and bosses that did not care about the worker, they cared only for the profit and if they worked the workers to hard, there was plenty of men looking for a job. Antanas also worked in the pickling section of the slaughter house, so he was walking around all day in several inches of disgusting slop that soaked through even the best boots.  

 Not only where working conditions bad the living conditions where not much better. Antanas and his family lived in a cheap house that was not much more than some cheap wood walls over a frame, when winter came the house did nothing against the harsh and bleak Chicago winters.
PROBING TIME!
Afton Ford Afton Ford
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Re: Chapter 7 - The Death of Dede Antanas

In reply to this post by Mr. Tobias

The events surrounding the death of Dede Antanas was that of the wedding, because the wedding was that of somewhat expenisve the whole family was forced to live on a tighter budget in America. Antanas although indeed an older man should not have been working in the job he was in. The conditons of packingtown were not that of suitable for an older man like Antanas. At his age he should not have been working because he needed to support the family. he should have been in the position where his family would be able to take care of him and not the other way around. Packingtown should have never been a place where people could live. What went on in there was something horrific the way that they killed the animals and they didnt even clean them up the right way. These conditions should have never been the way that they were. These conditions were the biggest reason why Antanas died when he did and what he died for. What is really sad is that no one even cared that he died because he can be replaced in the blink of an eye, business owners should never treat their employees like they are unwanted.
Afton Ford Afton Ford
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Re: Chapter 7 - The Death of Dede Antanas

In reply to this post by Shannon.Finley
I liked your post. It was quite detailed and I like how you related it to personal times
Daniel Rinard Daniel Rinard
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Re: Chapter 7 - The Death of Dede Antanas

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        Dede was the father of Jurgis and couldn’t really work due to his cough.  Dede came to America with Jurgis and was determined to get a job.  His dignity wouldn’t allow for everyone in the family to work including the women but not him.  Dede spends days and weeks out in the cold waiting for a job to help his family but finds none, until a man approaches him.  This man offers him a job if Dede will give him a portion of his pay in return.  Overjoyed, Dede returns home and informs Jurgis and the family, who seem proud of this achievement.  Their friends tell him that the man giving Dede a job is actually a boss who is playing the system and getting more profit off of Dede, who decides to go for the job anyway.  The work is scooping guts and meat into a hole while standing in a pool of blood and pickling juice/fluid, not exactly white collar work.  Dede even has to get a new pair of boots to “protect” him from the conditions, which doesn’t help with the stench, splashing and sloshing.  Dede’s cough worsens; he develops sores, and slowly starts to die.  He showed great dignity even when surrounded by inhumane conditions.  Just another place for lies and murder of the sterling machine called industry.  Dede’s story really shows just how unjust packing town is.  What type of place can really just work the men to death alongside the animals as if they were the same?  Just so that one man can be fat, cared for, and live in decadence supplied by the very lives of human beings.  He might as well put on a skin suit in the morning and have his daily dose of human flesh mingled in packing town meat from “animals”.
Ben Meler Ben Meler
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Re: Chapter 7 - The Death of Dede Antanas

In reply to this post by Mr. Tobias
The death of Dede was sudden, but expected. He was forced to work in pathetically awful conditions, and it came as no surprise that the frailest member of Jurgis’ crew would be the first to perish.
 Our impoverished protagonists are faced with a brutal winter, in a house that is unfinished and in majority unheated. They are essentially stuck in an icebox. The children are sent to bed in full dress, and they still struggle to keep warm. They lacked the necessary resources to provide an adequate living. Dede knew that, and he continued providing for his family even as he was dying of sickness. He knew he was going to die either way, so he chose to sacrifice his health to provide for others, instead of having them all starve to death. The job he had to do entailed wading through death liquid, which seeped through his boots and into the cuts in his feet. His fellow workers knew exactly what was happening to this poor old man, but they had become numb to such things…it was not uncommon for men to die in their line of work. The only reason his boss even noticed his ailment was that when he collapsed he was unable to work, and he was in fact, interfering with the work of others. The bosses primary concern was money. It was much more efficient to milk every last penny of reduced wages from this poor old man, as opposed to giving him time off or simply replacing him.
Packingtown is literally a giant heap of garbage. There are rivers of bubbling death that ooze through the streets. It’s incredibly painful to think that conditions like these were what was meant by “Land of Opportunity”. I'm surprised that the stupid kids who were rolling in the filth didn't contract some sort of plauge.
Ben Meler Ben Meler
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Re: Chapter 7 - The Death of Dede Antanas

In reply to this post by Daniel Rinard
Daniel Rinard wrote
 Just so that one man can be fat, cared for, and live in decadence supplied by the very lives of human beings.  He might as well put on a skin suit in the morning and have his daily dose of human flesh mingled in packing town meat from “animals”.
Those could be lyrics for a heavy metal song, they are disturbingly perfect. I very much enjoyed your response, nice vocabulary, and you very articulately expressed your points.
Ben Meler Ben Meler
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Re: Chapter 7 - The Death of Dede Antanas

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Matt Jenkins wrote
     Packing Town is so dirty because the people allow it to be. People are lured into the town with a promise of riches, and are submitted into a form of slavery of which they beg to participate. To be honest, Jurgis and his family probably could have done better if they stayed in Lithuania. If they weren't waken by a glamorous tractor beam of lies, packing town would actually have to be appealing in order to get citizens. But everyone is taken, and they live in a town covered in moral and physical impurity.
I love the way you write. It always comes off as some sort of brilliantly formulated argument with yourself, and you're always winning. You made some great points in your response, and i give you mad props for first post.
jared.buehner jared.buehner
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Re: Chapter 7 - The Death of Dede Antanas

In reply to this post by Mr. Tobias
In the seventh chapter of Sinclair’s novel, “The Jungle”, one of the characters, Dede Anatanas, dies due to the place in which he had lived in, has had a case of poor hygiene. The town that Dede Anatanas lived in was called “Packingtown” and had many different life threatening issues that caused Antanas’s death.
The first was that in the home that he and his family were living in, the house was said to have been build using incorrect and bad parts, basically making the house an unsafe area to occupy. Also, according to a somewhat legend, every family that has every lived in said house contracted a disease known as contraction, which causes coughing. Antanas had worked in areas, back in Lithuania, that caused him lung problems and the disease has carried to his stay in Packingtown as well, which did not help. Antanas also worked in a highly unhealthy surrounding, having to sweep up dead animal entrails and by practically walking in acid and chemicals, Antanas’s shoes were not made of a material strong enough to evade the corrosive properties of the chemicals, in which his shoes were burned through and the chemicals caused intense sores on his feet to develop. Add to that that he was attempting to survive the harsh winter in an area with little heating; the old man barely stood a chance at living through these hardships.
As you can see, Antanas, coughing blood and barley being able to walk, brings the reader to the embrace of Antanas’s death shortly after his absence from work. With this, the readers of “The Jungle” gain a sense that Packingtown was not the best place to work in. The combination of an unsafe work environment and a harsh winter would put many hardships on the inhabitants.
Mikey- Mikey-
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Re: Chapter 7 - The Death of Dede Antanas

In reply to this post by Mr. Tobias
     In chapter seven, Dede Antanas, Jurgis’ father unfortunately dies due to harsh living and working conditions.  In Packingtown during this time it was a difficult place to live, care for oneself and family. Horrible sickness robbed the town of lives during the winter, a harsh season.  Jurgis and his “pack”, family, all worked in places that had unsuitable conditions for any human.  These conditions were not suitable for just the young but more on the elderly, like Antanas Rudkus.
     Antanas worked in a cold pickle factory cellar sweeping the liquids down a drain.  The liquid was mixed with toxic chemicals which ate at his boots all the way causing a great pain and sores.  Along with the excruciating sore pain, he developed a cough.  He continued to work with these circumstances because he wanted to provide for the family just as everyone else was, until he collapsed. After days of lying in bed being cared for by Marija, coughing up blood, he died of consumption.  For Jurgis it was easier to focus on the funeral arrangements rather than the memories his father and him shared.
     The house in which they lived was not the greatest of places.  It was old, and not made out of materials that kept out the cold winds from outside.  The house was said to have a family member previous to Jurgis and his family to die due to consumption.  Consumption was hard to cure for the families of Packingtown, which of all were not in the best financial standing.
     This tragedy places a great spotlight on the horrid working conditions of this time period of America and Packingtown.  The worst of times to be working in the factories was during the winter, where the children had to wrap their heads to keep their faces warm or risk the dangers of the bitter cold.  Families would sit around the fire trying to soak up the heat that the fire put off.  These times were the worst for poor Antanas, who was dedicated to not let his sickness take him over.

KatieZamora KatieZamora
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Re: Chapter 7 - The Death of Dede Antanas

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The passing of Dede Antantas was inevitable especially when you take into account the horrid working conditions we was exposed to as well as the harsh weather.  Dede was a hard working man and understood that in America one would either work or die.  Sadly in his case, he simply worked himself to death.  Despite the praise the family believed about America being a land of opportunity and prosperity, they found themselves living day to day, working themselves to the bone.  Dede worked in disgusting areas and had grown fatally ill with a horrid, painful cough.  Deadly liquid seeped through to his feet which only made matters worse.  
Not only were working conditions terrible, mother nature wasn't too kind on the family either.  Winter had struck hard and the family could not afford extra blankets, coal, or better clothing to keep warm.  All of their extra money that wasn't going toward the numerous bills they had to keep up with went toward food.  Even then, the food wasn't nutritious enough to keep them healthy.  America had become a country of deception and cheat for it continued to rob the immigrants in every aspect.  Dede's death was just an example of how the life they so desperately craved became the life that destroyed them.
What’s truly depressing is that the workers and those in charge didn't give a damn about who died.  If someone dies that's considered a relatively good thing.  More work opportunity for others arises.  There was no sense of community and everyone was competing with each other for a source of income.  The working conditions in Packingtown were despicable, but the morals among society were nonexistent.  Other than trying to help Dede out, the bosses pushed him farther and farther until he broke.  Then they tossed him aside and let the next person in to take over.  Bosses would work their employees until they could no longer.  There were no labor laws that could have prevented this and Dede's death was just one among the many others caused by the unjust working conditions they were exposed to.
KatieZamora KatieZamora
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Re: Chapter 7 - The Death of Dede Antanas

In reply to this post by Matt Jenkins
Matt Jenkins wrote
Dede's bosses took no notice to his death. Another man would replace him the very instant he was absent. While Dede's death shows how a person will work for a cause bigger than themselves, it more shows how some people, given a position of great reward, will secure their prize.
I really like how you bring up the fact that Dede's death would not faze the bosses one bit.  As soon as an employee died, or hurt themselves to the point of being useless, they'd basically toss them out to the streets and let the next one in.  It was survival of the fittest and the bosses had unlimited supply of man power so they'd simply work their men to death.  This is just one way the working conditions were wrong.  No one cared what torment the employees faced.  Overall, I loved your style of writing this response.
KatieZamora KatieZamora
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Re: Chapter 7 - The Death of Dede Antanas

In reply to this post by Ben Meler
Ben Meler wrote
His fellow workers knew exactly what was happening to this poor old man, but they had become numb to such things…it was not uncommon for men to die in their line of work. The only reason his boss even noticed his ailment was that when he collapsed he was unable to work, and he was in fact, interfering with the work of others. The bosses primary concern was money. It was much more efficient to milk every last penny of reduced wages from this poor old man, as opposed to giving him time off or simply replacing him.
I find it sad that the bosses don't notice the agony of others, or at least they turn a blind eye to it.  I like how you mentioned this in your response.  The fact that the bosses only cared for the profit they made of the men contributed to the harsh conditions the workers faced.  The bosses can push them until they broke then easily go to the streets and pick out a new lad.  I really liked your response. It was straight to the point and easy to read.
ChristineLadra ChristineLadra
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Re: Chapter 7 - The Death of Dede Antanas

In reply to this post by Mr. Tobias
       Dede’s death was a very depressing aspect of the life of under paid and overworked immigrant workers of America at the time. Packingtown was a town of poor conditions health wise and housing wise which already did damage on one’s body in the harsh seasons. The children were becoming ill and so because they were poor, Teta was cheated out of her money when paying for medical herbs for the children’s health. In addition to the poor living circumstances, Dede had to work in a cold, damp, and dark basement that was filled with chemical sewage. The sewage eventually wore through his boots and soaked into the cuts and calluses on his feet.  It was winter and the family didn’t have the money for warm clothes, plus he was already an old man so his body wasn’t as strong and so he gave in to the toxins. He was aware that his job would be the end of him, but the alternative of quitting his job would mean that the family would suffer even more financially. So, Dede continued his terrible work until one day he just didn’t wake up. His co-workers were already aware of the illness because it was something that was common there. Dede’s boss didn’t even take any notice to his death and quickly found someone to replace him and things moved on leaving his family in despair.  This situation, among others, proved how wrong and terrible the industries of Packingtown really were. They only had profit in mind and had no thoughts towards the welfare of their workers.
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